Mackie HDR-24 – 24 channel, 24bit Digital Audio Hard Disk Recorder/Editor

$400.00

Mackie HDR-24 – 24 channel, 24bit Digital Audio Hard Disk Recorder/Editor

This listing is for a fully functioning Mackie HDR-24 – 24 channel, 24bit Digital Audio Hard Disk Recorder/Editor. Excellent cosmetic condition

This unit has been stored in a climate controlled storage for a few years and the system battery has gone dead. I will be replacing the battery as soon as I remember when I am at a store to purchase another battery. These batteries are common (DL2032). Because the battery is dead, the Mackie HDR-24 displays a common error on the monitor to reset the bios. Before this unit leaves the store, I will be resetting everything back to factory and fully operational condition.

The “System error 43, no communication with host” that displays on the unit’s display is due to the system battery being low (DL2032). After changing the battery, the BIOS will also need to be reset.

No HDD  key

1 in stock

SKU: PA-8002 Category:

Description

Mackie HDR-24 – 24 channel, 24bit Digital Audio Hard Disk Recorder/Editor

This listing is for a fully functioning Mackie HDR-24 – 24 channel, 24bit Digital Audio Hard Disk Recorder/Editor. Excellent cosmetic condition

This unit has been stored in a climate controlled storage for a few years and the system battery has gone dead. I will be replacing the battery as soon as I remember when I am at a store to purchase another battery. These batteries are common (DL2032). Because the battery is dead, the Mackie HDR-24 displays a common error on the monitor to reset the bios. Before this unit leaves the store, I will be resetting everything back to factory and fully operational condition.

The “System error 43, no communication with host” that displays on the unit’s display is due to the system battery being low (DL2032). After changing the battery, the BIOS will also need to be reset.

No HDD  key

 

Additional information

Weight 35.1 lbs
Dimensions 13.25 × 19 × 7 in
OVERVIEW AND SPECIFICATIONS

The Mackie HDR-24 front panel is logically laid out, with a bank of 24 (selectable) peak/VU LED meters with track arming lights and buttons beneath each track. A large, bright, numerical LED display shows locations in hours/minutes/seconds/frames or bars/beats/ticks, and includes status LEDs indicating clock and bit status. A 24-character, 4-line LCD indicates operational status and menu navigation with four soft-key switches and data Å (increment/decrement) keys beneath the menu select parameters and set modes. Eighteen additional switches are dedicated to various functions–ranging from looping and locate options, monitoring and record safe keys, SMPTE chase enable, etc. And every switch on the HDR24/96 has an associated LED that gives the user quick, visual feedback on what’s selected. The idea here is to reduce the user’s dependence on menus as much as possible, and other than simple selections such as choosing a project or which disk to record to, the menu operations are set and forget.

The base HDR24/96 does not include any I/O, and users may choose to fill its three I/O card slots with any of the four I/O cards available–which happen to be the same I/O cards that are offered for Mackie’s D8B digital console. The AIO-8 has eight analog inputs and eight analog outputs (all are +4dB line-level), terminated as two 25-pin D-sub connectors that are pin-compatible with the Tascam DA-88 connectors, so all the user needs to do is connect some DB25-to-XLR (or TRS) snakes, and start tracking. The DIO-8 card includes eight channels of digital I/O in both Tascam TDIF and ADAT Lightpipe formats, as well as a TDIF wordclock sync output on a BNC connector for older DTRS decks. The PDI-8 carries four stereo pairs (eight channels) of digital I/O in the form of AES/EBU signals on a single DB25connector. The OPT-8 card has input and output ports (eight channels each) in ADAT Lightpipe format.

I/O cards can be mixed and matched as desired and installing them is easy. Each card slides into a slot on the rear panel card cage, snaps into place with a reassuring thunk and attaches via two thumbscrews. Also on the back panel are ports for attaching a PC keyboard, mouse, 1/4-inch punch-in/out foot switch, 15-pin D-sub for a SVGA external monitor, Ethernet100 Base-T via RJ-45, remote control (also RJ-45), MIDI in/out on a 9-pin D-sub and a sync card with wordclock/SMPTE chase in/video black burst sync.

Inside:

The heart of the unit is a PC–a 433MHz Intel Celeron motherboard, to be exact–and it has all of the usual PC stuff there. This is good, because Mackie didn’t have to reinvent the wheel to develop this product, and standard items, such as the ATI Rage Pro AGP 8MB monitor graphics card and PC power supplies, are commonly available parts, so a quick trip to a local computer swap meet for $20 in parts. Cool! At the same time, components such as the internal IDE drive could be swapped out for a bigger drive such as a terabyte drive and dropping it into your HDR24/96.

Drives:

Perhaps one of the HDR24/96’s most intriguing features is the Mackie Media drive bay on the front panel. The bay accepts Mackie Media M90cartridges, essentially 22GB UDMA IDE hard drives (offering approximately 90 minutes of 24-track record time at 24-bit/48 kHz) that are preformatted, mounted in a standard RH-58 removable drive tray and include a padded library storage case for keeping your creations (or backups) on a bookshelf. Do-it-yourselfers may want to buy their own trays (around $30 from computer suppliers on the Web) and IDE drives. As it is now, one M90 holds the equivalent of about six reels of 2-inch tape running at 30 ips, making the M90s an affordable alternative for backup or direct recording, because the M90 media has adequate throughput for live 24-track tracking sessions or remote recordings.

On the subject of file exchange, the HDR24/96 writes files in standard .AIFF format, and there are several ways to transfer files to/from another workstation. The simplest is simply to play all the files (output via Lightpipe) and record them digitally into the other system. Alternatively, files written to either of the HDR24/96’sremovable drive formats could be read by a PC or a newer Mac–assuming you invest in an external (or internal if you’re doing it all the time) RH-58 drive bay. The other option is to use the HDR24/96’s built-in 100Base T Ethernet port to transfer tracks to another Ethernet-equipped computer or server.

Operations:

Once set, all I had to do was arm some tracks (pushing the buttons under each track meter) and press Play-Record to get rolling. By the way, the transport buttons have a great feel–you can hear the reassuring click of an internal relay whenever any of the keys are pressed.

The ability to use the HDR24/96 without a monitor is actually one of the product’s virtues, especially in situations, such as remote recording gigs, where a monitor is not really required or even desirable–space is often limited at live gigs and a monitor can be distracting to nearby audience members, etc. That said, adding a monitor/keyboard/mouse to the HDR24/96 really opens up the unit’s creative and utilitarian potential, as well as speeding operations. Seeing the scrolling waveforms, virtual transport controls, time code display, on screen metering, etc., also adds a definite cool factor.

Editing on the HDR24/96

The real power of an additional monitor is demonstrated when using the extensive and comprehensive editing functions. As well as the usual Cut/Copy/Paste commands, the unit includes such features as 999 levels of undo, nondestructive drag-and-drop crossfades, regions and super regions, looping, track slipping, shuttle and analog style scrubbing, quantization, track/take bouncing, snap-to-grid and 192 virtual takes (eight per track x 24 tracks). The virtual takes are ideal for comp’ing multiple vocal or solo takes into a seamless performance, without having to give up tracks to get it done.

Despite the modestly powered 433MHz CPU, the HDR24/96 is not sluggish at all, and edit operations and screen redraws were fast–actually redrawing waveforms as they were being edited. One secret to this is the unit’s custom operating system, which is based on the OS developed for the D8B mixer and was designed specifically for audio. The Mackie OS is somewhere between Windows and MacOS in appearance and operation, yet with no “bloating” at all. It’s lean and mean–in fact, the entire OS fits on two floppy disks.

The edit interface is clean and logical. A large 24-channel meter panel at the top of the screen (great during tracking/overdubbing) can be re-placed with a large editing tools window, which offers quick access to any of the edit modes, locator points and nudge tools. As with accessing the recording functions, users can stumble in and do about 85% of all editing operations without getting bogged down in manuals or becoming lost. The look and feel of the edit screen will be familiar to anyone who’s used other workstations, and users have the option of working with mouse or keyboard commands.

A node tool provides a volume automation function for creating envelopes that can dynamically change track output levels via simply clicking on sections using the pencil tool. Although no substitute for full-blown mix automation, I found it useful for creating fades or muting unwanted sections (say, a tempo count at the beginning of a drum track) without actually deleting the material.

A node tool provides a volume automation function for creating envelopes that can dynamically change track output levels via simply clicking on sections using the pencil tool. Although no substitute for full-blown mix automation, I found it useful for creating fades or muting unwanted sections (say, a tempo count at the beginning of a drum track) without actually deleting the material.

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